★★★★ “Erin Doherty emerges as one of the year’s great discoveries” | My Name is Rachel Corrie reviews

The reviews are rolling in for My Name is Rachel Corrie, directed by JMK Award winner Josh Roche and starring Erin Doherty as Rachel Corrie.

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Erin Doherty as Rachel Corrie in My Name is Rachel Corrie. Photo by Ellie Kurrtz.

★★★★
“Erin Doherty emerges as one of the year’s great discoveries with a stunning performance” 

The Guardian | Read the full review

★★★★ “Erin Doherty is riveting as Corrie…humorous and humanising” 
The Stage | Read the full review

★★★★ “Josh Roche’s brilliant staging” 
WhatsOnStage | Read the full review

Erin Doherty in My Name is Rachel Corrie at the Young Vic. Photo by Ellie Kurrtz (4).JPG

Erin Doherty as Rachel Corrie in My Name is Rachel Corrie. Photo by Ellie Kurrtz.

My Name is Rachel Corrie runs in the Clare until 26 Oct with best availability on 25 Oct matinee. Find out more about the show and read what audiences are saying so far in our Storify round-up.

Erin Doherty in My Name is Rachel Corrie at the Young Vic. Photo by Ellie Kurrtz (6).JPG

Erin Doherty as Rachel Corrie in My Name is Rachel Corrie. Photo by Ellie Kurrtz.

THE JMK AWARD

James Menzies-Kitchin was a theatre director of thrilling promise. The JMK Trust was founded in his memory to give practical learning opportunities to young theatre directors of similar ability and vision. The JMK Award allows one such director a year to stage their own production of a classic text.

The JMK Award 2017 is kindly supported by Philip Hooker, The Arts Patrons Trust, The Martin Bowley Charitable Trust, The Garrick Charitable Trust, The Fidelio Charitable Trust, the Young Vic and all our individual supporters. Patrons: Dame Judi Dench, Baroness Howe, Sir Ian McKellen and Tom Morris OBE (Founding Chair) Registered Charity No. 295080

www.jmktrust.org

❄️ Winter is coming | 2018 Genesis Future Directors Award Winner

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It is with great pride that we announce today the recipient of the 2018 Genesis Future Directors Award is John R. Wilkinson. He will direct Winter by Jon Fosse (14 – 24 February 2018). Tickets are now on sale! 

We are thrilled that all performances of Winter will be audio described; visit our access for all page for more information.

Winter
by Jon Fosse
Direction John R. Wilkinson

An ordinary businessman meets a volatile stranger in a park. So begins a fugue of splintered desires and mistaken meanings.

An everyday encounter unspools with enduring consequences.

Genesis Award winner John R. Wilkinson directs this riveting and hypnotic play.

When performed at the Young Vic in 2011, Jon Fosse’s I am the Wind was described in the Independent as “Some of the greatest theatre I have ever witnessed”.

For more info and to book tickets: www.youngvic.org/whats-on/winter

John R. Wilkinson made his directorial debut in 2013 with Can’t Stand Up for Falling Down (York Theatre Royal).  Dramaturgical credits include: You Have Been Watching (Dark Horse) and To Kill a Mockingbird (York Theatre Royal). He is Associate Artist at York Theatre Royal, being mentored by Third Angel. In 2016 he was co-assistant director to Rufus Norris during a four-day intensive workshop and worked as a Connections Director (National Theatre). He trained at Bretton Hall College.

GENESIS FOUNDATION
Established in 2012, the Genesis Future Directors Award was created to nurture emerging directors by providing them with an opportunity to explore and develop their craft while creating their first fully resourced production at the Young Vic, recognised for its engagement with young directors. The Award will provide John R. Wilkinson with mentoring and support from the theatre’s unique creative network, which includes Artistic Director David Lan, Genesis Fellow Gbolahan Obisesan, Lead Producer Daisy Heath and Associate Artistic Director Sue Emmas.
www.genesisfoundation.org.uk

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof to be broadcast with NT Live

Hot on the heels of our Yerma NT Live broadcast, we’re thrilled to announce our West End production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof will be broadcast to cinemas around the world on 22 February 2018. 

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Sienna Miller (Maggie) and Jack O’Connell (Brick) in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Photo by Johan Persson. 

Starring Sienna Miller, Jack O’Connell and Colm Meaney, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof is our first production to debut in the West End and it had received rave reviews from critics and audiences alike, so we are over the moon that even more people all over the UK and the world will have the opportunity to see it through NT Live. You can watch the teaser trailer for the show here.

Tickets will go on sale on Monday 25 September. Set those alarms ⏰

The National Theatre’s ground-breaking project broadcasts plays live from the stage to over 700 cinemas in the UK and over 60 countries internationally. Details of all NT Live screenings can be found at: http://ntlive.nationaltheatre.org.uk/.

Cat On a Hot Tin Roof concludes its 12 week limited West End run at the Apollo Theatre on 7 October 2017.

The role of Big Mama in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof

Lisa Palfrey who plays Big Mama in the Young Vic’s production of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof at the Apollo Theatre is indisposed having had to undergo an emergency appendectomy.

During this time the role of Big Mama will be played by Kerry Fox until Lisa is well enough to continue giving her widely praised performance.

David Lan and Lucy Woollatt of the Young Vic said:

“All of us – and especially last week’s packed houses – are enormously grateful to Katy Brittain for covering so brilliantly for Lisa Palfrey after Lisa was taken ill. And we’re delighted that our old friend the great Kerry Fox has agreed with alacrity to step in to play Big Mama until Lisa is well enough to rejoin the ‘Cat’ company. Great thanks to everyone for their generosity and good will over this period. All our best wishes and love to Lisa for a speedy recovery.”

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof plays at the Apollo Theatre until 4 October. 

An evening with Peter Brook at the Young Vic

The legendary Peter Brook, ‘our greatest living theatre director’ (The Independent), will join the Young Vic’s Artistic Director David Lan to discuss his new book Tip of the Tongue: Reflections on Language and Meaning and his remarkable career on Wednesday 13 September.

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Peter Brook by Régis d’Audeville.

In Tip of the Tongue, Peter Brook takes a charming, playful and wise look at topics such as the subtle, telling differences between French and English and the many levels on which we can appreciate the works of Shakespeare. Brook also revisits his seminal concept of the ’empty space’, considering how theatre – and the world – have changed over the course of his life.

After the talk and audience Q&A session, Peter will sign copies of his new book.

Following the book signing, there will be a special screening of The Tightrope (2012). In this revealing behind-the-scenes documentary, director Simon Brook – Peter’s son – takes us into the rehearsal room to witness Brook’s inspiring, powerful and intimate rehearsal process.

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An evening with Peter Brook will take place at 6pm in the Maria studio at the Young Vic Theatre on Wednesday 13 September. Tickets are available to book here. Tip of the Tongue: Reflections on Language and Meaning by Peter Brook is available to buy from nickhernbooks.co.uk

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ “An electric storm of a performance” | Nina reviews

The reviews are in for Nina: A Story about me & Nina Simone !
Josette Bushell-Mingo, and her three piece band, mix story and song as she draws together tales from the life of Nina Simone, Josette’s own extraordinary career and the Black Lives Matter movement. This production is all sold out but you are welcome to join our returns queue from 6.45pm each night.

You can read the reviews below and check out what audiences have been saying so far in our Storify round up.

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Josette Bushell-Mingo and band in Nina at the Young Vic. Photo by Simon Annand

 

★★★★
“An electric storm of a performance”
Time Out | Read the full review

★★★★
“Amid this darkness, there’s also much light. Bushell-Mingo inhabits instinctively the union of joy and protest in Simone’s sound.”
The Times| Read the full review

★★★★
“Josette Bushell-Mingo’s searing one-woman show pushes the boundaries of theatre.”
The Stage| Read the full review

Nina: A Story about me & Nina Simone runs in the Young Vic Maria studio until 29 July before it heads to the Traverse Theatre at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

5 things you didn’t know about Nina Simone (& even if you did they’re still pretty incredible)

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Josette Bushell-Bingo in Nina at the Young Vic. Photo by Simon Annand.

1. What’s in a name? Nina Simone was born in 1933 as the slightly-less-catchy Eunice Waymon. She decided to change it after taking a job as a pianist at a bar in Atlantic City and being told she was going to have to sing too. Terrified her Methodist preacher mother would find out she was singing the “devil’s music”, she laid low under this new name which would soon become iconic. “Nina” was a term of endearment used by an ex-boyfriend whilst “Simone” came from the French actress Simone Signoret.

2. “This Bach, I liked him!” Young Nina began playing the piano as a 3 year old in church, crossing the railroad tracks to the white part of town to study classical piano for free lessons which she adored. Her aim was to be the first black classical pianist in America. It was on this journey that she encountered racism as a young girl, paving the way for her later career in activism: first when her parents were moved to the back of the church during her first piano recital to make way for a white family (Nina refused to play unless they were brought back to the front); then again when she was rejected from the Philadelphia’s Curtis Institute of Music based on her race (she carried on trying, and did get into the Julliard School of Music).

3. Come and knock on my door… Malcolm X and Nina Simone lived next door to one another in Mount Vernon, New York during the late 1960s. The pair were united in their approach to the Civil Rights Movement, believing that a militant stance would be more effective at taking on the establishment than the peaceful protest offered up by Martin Luther King Jr. This was in great contrast to Nina’s early life where she had been taught that racism was the “great unspoken” in her childhood home.

4. “A love affair with fire” – Lisa Simone on her mother. Nina’s second husband Andrew Stroud gave up his day job to become her manager and producer full-time not long after they met and fell in love. They were introduced  in March 1961 while she was playing at a midtown supper club and he was a formidable New York City police officer. Their marriage turned tempestuous, with Stroud becoming abusive before she eventually left him.

5. The messages in Nina’s songs are as relevant today as ever. Nina’s passionate, revolutionary protest anthems such as Mississippi Goddam – a direct response to the murder of Medgar Evers and the Alabama church bombings which killed four children in 1963 – were a call to action and a truly inspiring point of change in the black power movement. In recent years, in the US, the UK and the world over, there have been political stirrings reminiscent of those seen in the 60s and 70s. Nina and her songs are perhaps even more necessary now than ever before.

Nina: A Story about me and Nina Simone runs until 29 July in the Maria studio at the Young Vic. Tickets are sold out but we’ll be operating a returns queue at the box office in advance of each performance.

🎧🎶Listen to our Nina Simone playlist on Spotify to get you in the mood… 🎧🎶