The Genesis Future Directors Award 2018 is now open for applications!

Applications are now open for the Genesis Future Directors Award 2018, and this year we are specifically looking to strengthen our commitment to diversity by calling for applications from D/deaf or disabled emerging directors, and emerging directors who want to work with a cast that includes D/deaf or disabled actors. If you’re interested in applying please read on for guidelines and a step by step overview of the application process! 

George Ikediashi, Kamari Romeo & Rebecca Root in The Bear The Proposal at the Young Vic © Ellie Kurttz (2)

2017 Genesis Future Directors Award winner Lucy J Skilbeck’s The Bear/The Proposal at the Young Vic. Photo by Ellie Kurttz.

The Genesis Future Directors Award at the Young Vic 2018

The close relationship between the Genesis Foundation and the Young Vic dates back over more than 10 years. The generous support we have received has been crucial to establishing and maintaining our work with directors which is at the heart of everything we do.

The Genesis Future Directors Award enables us to identify, support and nurture a director to explore their craft and stage a production in the Clare Theatre. The Award is aimed at young and / or emerging directors who have demonstrated a talent for, and commitment to, directing but have had limited opportunity to make work.

THE AWARD

The Young Vic has a deep commitment to diversity. This is seen in the shows we create and present, as well as in the people we work with. We know that UK theatres have a long way to go to engage with and speak to the full range of experience of the people living in this country. We want to do what we can to change that.

To help us be as inclusive as possible, our programming aims to embrace diversity, difference, ambition and excellence. In 2018, the Genesis Future Directors Award will be an opportunity for the Young Vic to meet and work with D/deaf and disabled directors, designer and / or actors.

We would like to receive proposals from:

  • D/deaf or disabled emerging directors
  • Emerging directors who want to work with a cast that includes D/deaf or disabled actors

Non-disabled directors should be able to demonstrate a commitment to diversity and access in their previous work, even if they have not yet directed a piece of fully integrated theatre.

The selected director will have the opportunity to rehearse for four weeks on a play for the Clare Theatre. The production will be part of the Young Vic’s programme and will be fully supported by the Young Vic’s creative, administrative and production teams. The director will receive a fee and the actors will be paid a Young Vic company wage. The award will conclude with 12 performances to a paying audience in spring 2018.

The director will be supported by a full creative team including producer, designer, lighting designer, sound designer and stage management team, as well as a casting director. They will also be mentored through the full preparation and rehearsal process by the core creative team at the Young Vic, as well as an external mentor.

Where appropriate, directors should consider creative approaches to making the show accessible.

The emerging director (whether D/deaf, disabled or non-disabled) should:

  • Have already demonstrated a talent for and a commitment to directing
  • Have directed at least one professional production but are at an early stage of their development as a director
  • Demonstrated a commitment to originality and a desire to expand their understanding of theatre practice
  • Be fascinated by the actor’s process and the director’s role in it
  • Be resident in the UK
  • Be available to direct the production in spring 2018

You do not have to be a member of the Young Vic Genesis Directors Network to apply but we encourage you to join.  You can find more information on the Directors Program at the Young Vic here.

HOW TO APPLY

STAGE ONE

Please choose a play and provide a single A4 page that covers the following:

  • Your initial ideas for a production of the play
  • Your ideas for your creative team and how they would help deliver your vision

The play should be an existing text with a production history. It should not be a new play, an adaptation or a play that needs dramaturgical work. You will need to achieve your production with a maximum of three actors. The production should not require supernumeraries, a community chorus or equivalent.

We are most interested in your initial ideas for the production – please feel free to express your ideas in notes, bullet points, diagrams, stream of consciousness etc. We encourage you to use whichever form best suits your ideas and approach.

Please also send CV (see below for format).

The deadline for applications is noon on Monday 12 June 2017.

If you have any availability issues please let us know at this stage and we can do our best to accommodate your needs.

Please send your application addressed to Sue Emmas at directorsprogram@youngvic.org with THE GENESIS FUTURE DIRECTORS AWARD in the subject box.

STAGE TWO

Directors are invited to present a Lightning Talk; this is a presentation that gives each director 10 powerpoint slides for 15 seconds each with accompanying commentary.

The Lightning Talk should give a flavour of:

  • Your past work
  • Your response to, and initial ideas for, your chosen play

If you are D/deaf or disabled and a Lightning Talk is not a format that will best communicate your ideas please let us know and we will discuss with you the most effective way for us to find out about your proposed play.

Also let us know if there are adjustments we should consider making. This might include: hearing loop, BSL interpreter, quiet environment, longer presentation time, for example.

We will confirm time slots for Lightning Talks on Wednesday 14 June.

The Lightning Talks will take place between 10am and 5pm on Friday 7 July. If you have specific availability issues please let us know in your Stage One application.

You will need to submit your Lightning Talk by midday on Monday 3 July. This should be sent to Kirsten Adam at directorsprogram@youngvic.org.

You will also need to send an electronic copy of the script and ideally, you should know that the rights for the play are available in principle.

STAGE THREE

Following the Lightning Talks a small group of directors will then be invited to meet with David Lan, Sue Emmas and other members of the Young Vic team on afternoon of Thursday 20 July.

If you have any questions or queries please contact Kirsten Adam on directorsprogram@youngvic.org or Textphone 020 7922 2805. 

We are very happy to talk through the process and if you would like to discuss the format or the timeframe of the application process please get in touch. 

If you would like the guidelines in a different format please let us know.

Clare Dunne and Solomon Israel in Dutchman at the Young Vic. Photo by Richard Hubert Smith.jpg

2016 Genesis Future Directors Award winner Ola Ince’s Dutchman at the Young Vic. Photo by Richard Hubert Smith.


About the Genesis Foundation

The Genesis Foundation has supported the Young Vic for nearly 15 years, including the Young Vic’s director’s program since its inception. The Genesis Foundation is pleased to fund the Genesis Fellow and Genesis Fellow Production Fund, the Genesis Future Directors Awards and the Genesis Directors Network at the Young Vic.

Established by John Studzinski in 2001, the Genesis Foundation works in partnership with the leaders of prestigious UK arts organisations such as LAMDA, the National Theatre, Royal Court, The Sixteen and the Young Vic.  Its largest funding commitment is to programmes that support directors, playwrights, actors and musicians in the early stages of their professional lives.

The theme of art and faith increasingly characterises aspects of the Foundation’s work with choral commissions including James MacMillan’s Stabat mater.

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About the Young Vic

The Young Vic based in Waterloo in London produces classics, new plays, forgotten works, musicals and opera, and tours widely in the UK and internationally. It has deep roots in its neighbourhood and extensive co-producing relationships with leading theatres all over the world. The Young Vic’s Directors Program provides support for professional directors at the early stages of their career.  It offers free skills workshops and peer-led projects, paid assistant directing roles through the Jerwood Assistant Director Program and Boris Karloff Trainee Assistant Director Program on Young Vic productions, and our online network, the Genesis Directors Network.

 

Just released! A limited number of tickets for the opening night of Yerma

For the return of Yerma, the opening night on Saturday 29 July will be a special performance to raise funds for our Directors Program which supports emerging directors across the UK.

The production just won two Olivier awards on Sunday, adding to Billie Piper’s previous wins for this role including Best Actress Evening Standard Theatre Awards, Best Actress Critic’s Circle Theatre Awards and Best Actress WhatsOnStage Awards.

Tickets for the performance and an after party with the cast and creative team are priced at £125 and £250. All proceeds go towards our Directors Program.

As the most extensive scheme of its kind, the Directors Program offers support for professional directors at an early stage of their career. Opportunities include skills workshops, exploratory projects and paid assistant directing roles.

NT Live will also be broadcasting a performance live to cinemas across the world on 31 August (with encore screenings to follow). Book for NT Live now.

Book tickets to the Opening Night

11 Questions with the cast of Why It’s Kicking Off Everywhere – Lara Sawalha

Paul Mason and Lara Sawalha in Why It's Kicking Off Everywhere at the Young Vic. Photo by David Sandison..jpg

Paul Mason and Lara Sawalha in Why It’s Kicking Off Everywhere at the Young Vic. Photo by David Sandison.

What’s your favourite play you’ve ever seen, been in or read?

There are too many to pick from because each play I’ve seen has left a mark and impacted me in different ways. One that comes to mind is a play I read called The Heresy of Love – a must read.

What can the audience expect from this production that’s different to anything else they are likely to have seen before?

To feel completely immersed in what’s happening around them, like they’re leading the revolution.

What protest or activism have you most recently taken part in or supported?

Protesting against apartheid in Palestine.

Describe in one word what you hope the audience will take away from this show?

Awareness.

What is your favourite midnight snack?

Humous and pitta bread.

What is the funniest protest sign you’ve ever seen?

“I can’t believe we still have to protest this shit”.

Where is your favourite place in the world?

Once I get those wings and fly I’ll let you know (refer to supernatural question). My favourite place constantly changes, so I always have many!

Who is your ultimate hero, and what would you say to them if you ever met them?

I have many but one of them is Maya Angelou and I would take her dancing.

Which historic revolution or protest do you wish you could have been a part of?

Walking across the bridge with Martin Luther King Jr.

If you could have any one supernatural power which would you choose and why?

To fly so everyday I could experience a different part of the world.

What role do you think the arts plays in activism?

It’s another platform to speak and be heard to express and change the world.

If you could swap lives with anybody for one day, who would it be and why?

Donald Trump so that I can actually understand how his brain works, because it really doesn’t make sense.

What’s one thing about the future that makes you feel positive?

Seeing people around me working hard to improve the world of today for the generations of tomorrow.

Why It’s Kicking Off Everywhere will be broadcast on BBC Two this year as part of Performance Live, a two-year strand of programmes developed between Arts Council England and Battersea Arts Centre.

Read what audiences have been saying about #KickingOffLive so far.

Good Chance launch a brand new temporary theatre in Paris

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We’re pleased to announce that Young Vic associate company Good Chance have built and launched a new temporary theatre in Paris following on from their previous venue at the refugee camp in Calais last year.

The team have spent the last four months in Paris, trying to understand the complex problems faced by the growing refugee population there. Through meeting and talking with theatres, artists and humanitarian associations they set out to create an inclusive space that helps to create empathy and understanding through theatre and art.

The theatre is an impressive 11-metre dome, that will migrate through Paris with a longer term view of setting the theatre up during long encampments in different places. The Good Chance team will be creating a daily artistic programme with local people and refugees.

A spokesperson for Good Chance said “As the ties between Britain and Europe are redrawn, we want to build new cultural links with our French and international friends, standing alongside them as we re-imagine new, more exciting, more united worlds.

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The Good Chance team were joined by members of the Young Vic team to help with the build. 

Good Chance Paris will be in the north of the city in partnership with Collectif MU before moving to the gardens of the Theatre de la Ville for the duration of the Chantiers d’Europe Festival (2-24 May) before continuing its migration across Paris.

Pioneering theatre company Good Chance are based at the Young Vic. Good Chance builds temporary theatres of hope and works in solidarity to make people’s voices heard.

For more information, please visit http://goodchance.org.uk/

Photography credit: David Sandison

 

Full Life of Galileo Casting Announced

We’re over the moon to announce the full casting for Life of Galileo directed by BAFTA winner Joe Wright. Brendan Cowell is joined by Ayesha Antoine, Jason Barnett, Billy Howle, Paul Hunter, Joshua James, Bettrys Jones, Alex Murdoch, Brian Pettifer, Anjana Vasan and Sarah Wright. Find out more about each cast member below.

Ayesha AntonieAyesha Antoine
returns to the Young Vic after appearing in trade.
Recent theatre credits: Dirty Great Love Story (Arts Theatre); The Suicide (National Theatre); Red Velvet (West End, Garrick Theatre), The Wolf in Snakeskin Shoes, The House That Will Not Stand (Tricycle Theatre); The Ghost Train (Royal Exchange), We Are Proud To Present A Presentation About The Herero (Bush Theatre), My Wonderful Day (Stephen Joseph Theatre, 59E59 Theaters and UK tour, for which she won a TMA Award for Best Supporting Performance in a Play and was Drama Desk Award nominated)
Film credits: Operation Gadgetman
TV credits: Pompidou, Bellamy’s People, Skins, Mouth To Mouth, Doctor Who, Parents of the Band, Bigger Better Brighter and Placebo.

jason Barnett

Jason Barnett returns to the Young Vic after appearing in About a Boy.
Recent theatre credits: Prime Time, Friday Night Sex, The Victorian in the Wall (Royal Court); Emil and the Detectives, Warhorse (National Theatre); Mogadishu (Lyric Hammersmith) and The Winter’s Tale, Pericles, Days Of Significance (Royal Shakespeare Company)
Film credits: London Road, Cinderella, Superbob, One Man And His Dog and The Sight
TV credits: Porridge, Bliss, Jonathan Creek, Josh, Agatha Raisin, Death In Paradise, The Javone Prince Show and Bad Education

Billy Howle
Billy Howle
makes his Young Vic debut in Life of Galileo.
Recent theatre credits: Long Day’s Journey Into Night, The Little Mermaid (Bristol Old Vic) and Ghosts (Brooklyn Academy of Music).
Film credits: On Chesil Beach, The Sense of an Ending and The Seagull
TV credits: The Witness for the Prosecution, Cider with Rosie, Glue, Vera and New Worlds

 

Paul Hunter returns to the Paul HunterYoung Vic following Animal
Farm, The Water Engine
and My Perfect Mind.
Recent theatre credits: The Little Match Girl, The Mystery Plays, Much Ado About Nothing (Shakespeare’s Globe); Gaslight (Northampton); Tartuffe (Birmingham Rep) and My Perfect Mind (Young Vic, Theatre Royal Plymouth and 59E59 Theaters, New York).
Film credits: Denial, This Beautiful Fantastic, Pan, Marvellous, Cinderella and Malificent
TV credits: Trinity, After You’ve Gone, Absolute Power and Tunnel of Love
Paul is also Artistic Director of Told by an Idiot.

Joshua JamesJoshua James makes his Young Vic debut in Life of Galileo.
Recent theatre credits: Platonov/The Seagull, Here We Go, Light Shining In Buckinghamshire, Treasure Island (National Theatre); The War Has Not Started Yet (Theatre Royal Plymouth); Fathers And Sons (Donmar Warehouse), Bringing Up The Bodies, Wolf Hall (Royal Shakespeare Company) and No Quarter (The Royal Court)
Film credits: Darkest Hour, Criminal and Summer in February
TV credits: Black Mirror, McMafia, Utopia, Whites, Silent Witness and IdBettrys Jonesentity

Bettrys Jones makes her debut at the Young Vic in Life of Galileo.
Recent theatre credits: The Little Match Girl (Shakespeare’s Globe); We Want You to Watch, Edward II (National Theatre), Praxis Makes Perfect (National Theatre of Wales, Berlin tour) and Sleeping Beauties (Sherman Theatre Cymru)
Film credits: Private Peaceful
TV credits: Doctors and Skins
Radio credits: Home Front, Emile Zola: Blood, Sex And Money, Blood and Milk, Just a Girl Final Call and The Corrections

Alex MurdochAlex Murdoch makes her debut at the Young Vic in Life of Galileo.
Recent theatre credits: Lifegame (The Cockpit), Everything by My Side (Southbank Centre, Adam’s Place, Latitude Festival), Around the World in 80 Days (Polka Theatre and UK tour), Animo (New Diorama Theatre and Latitude Festival) and Permission Improbable (Battersea Arts Centre), The Powercut Compendium (UK tour), The Irish Giant (Southwark Playhouse) and Made Up (Soho Theatre).
Alex is currently under commission as a writer at the Royal Shakespeare Company.

 

Brian Pettifer makes his debut at the Young Vic in Life of Brian PettiferGalileo.
Recent theatre credits: Young Chekhov: Ivanov, Platonov (Chichester Festival Theatre & National Theatre); Yer Granny, The Missing (National Theatre of Scotland); Scenes Unseen, The Drawer Boy (Tron Theatre); Great Expectations (UK tour); The Fairy Queen (Glyndebourne and international tour) and The King of Scotland (Theatre Babel and winner of the Fringe First Award at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival).
Film credits: Darkest Hour, Whisky Galore!, The Legend Of Barney Thomson, Donkeys (winner of Best Feature Film at the British Academy Scotland Awards 2011) and Lassie
TV credits: Black Mirror, The Musketeers, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell and The Field of Blood

VirginiaAnjana Vasan makes her Young Vic debut in Life of Galileo.
Recent theatre credits: A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Shakespeare’s Globe); Image of an Unknown Young Woman (Gate Theatre); Dara, Behind the Beautiful Forevers (National Theatre), Macbeth (Park Avenue Armory, New York City) and First Encounters: Taming of the Shrew (Royal Shakespeare Company)
Film credits: The Children Act, Cinderella and Jack Ryan
TV credits: Ill Behaviour, Black Mirror, Call the Midwife, Fresh Meat and Asia At War: Fighting For India: The Women Who Dared

 

Sarah Wright was born and brought up at the Little Angel Theatre, London and has worked extensively within physical and puppetry-based theatre ever since.
Puppet Direction and Consultation credits: Very Old Man with Enormous Wings, Cupid and Psyche, Angelo (Little Angel Theatre); The Empress, Tempest (Royal Shakespeare Company) and Brief Encounter, Red Shoes, Hansel and Gretel (UK tour).
As a performing Puppeteer credits: Venus and Adonis (Royal Shakespeare Company, Little Angel Theatre); Very Old Man with Enormous Wings, The Little Mermaid, Sleeping Beauty (Little Angel Theatre); The Tower, Planetarium Silo, Hotel (Silo Theatre Amsterdam) and Plucked, Hollow Men (Faulty Optic).
Music and Puppet work credits: The Soldiers Tale, Renard, Geneviève de Brabant, Faust, Philemon and Baucis, Potsdam, Satyagraha, research for Improbable Theatre, English National Opera, Welsh National Opera and Houston Grand Opera.

Life of Galileo directed by Joe Wright runs in the Main House at the Young Vic 6 May – 24 June. You can find more information and book tickets here

“The laundry bill must be incredible” – How DO our wardrobe team cope with #YVDream Mud?

The Young Vic costume department have been both complimented and commiserated with, by critics and audience members alike as to how they have to deal with our A Midsummer Night Dream mud every night. Especially those white pants…. come on! We talked to Head of Costume Catherine Kodicek about how this is done. 

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“Over the years we have been challenged by lots of productions when it comes to the laundry and maintenance of the costumes; oodles of blood from all kinds of injuries, bags of vomit made from soup and other food items, bottles of ink, water with brown dye in it which the actors fall in to, sticky champagne that gets sprayed over them, paint which they cover themselves in, make-up and even a food fight with trifle, but nothing has really compared to the mud in A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Not since the *blood rain* in A View From The Bridge has every single item of costume come up completely covered and needing to be transformed back to its clean self.

The key to survival is to have doubles of as many of the costumes as possible so that they do not get washed every single day. Washing and drying can wear out even very robust fabrics. There will always be items from vintage shops and markets that you cannot buy a second version of so if possible make replicas of these. The more duplicates you have the fewer times each item will be washed and the longer they will look good. Some of the actors in the show have between 2 and 6 versions of their costumes.

  • Before we let any actual costumes get muddy we did a wash test with some old clothes to see how washable the mud was- the answer was *not very washable on natural fibres*. On man made fabric such as polyester and nylon the mud comes out relatively easy. On natural fibres such as cotton and linen the fabric wants to hold the mud particles and so the mud is harder to get out.
  • Using the same method we used successfully on the Wardrobe staff doing the laundryblood rain did not help us. Every
    heavily soiled item needed rinsing or soaking, scrubbing then washing, rinsing and washing again before it was clean. In the end the magic ingredient to dislodge the mud particles was washing up liquid!!  (an old trick recommended by Upstage Theatrical Dry Cleaners who we use regularly for dry cleaning).
  • Every item still needed to be scrubbed and then washed, but the washing up liquid proved to be more successful that any of the oxy action or other *stain removal* products. We discovered that the cheaper the detergent the better, as it produces fewer bubbles and makes rinsing easier.
  • We found that drying the suit trousers first and brushing off the surface mud prior to surface washing gave the best results. Finally we also ran the whites through an ecological bleach to freshen them regularly and let the lighting do the rest.”

So there you have it. How to clean a entire company’s costumes every night post mud-roll.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream runs in the YV Main House until 1 April. For more information and to book, click here.

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11 Questions with the cast of See Me Now – Flynt

flyntFormer development executive Flynt (née Daniel Inglés, née Gabriel) was reborn in Paris in 2012 under the instruction of Madame Paula, a legendary Latina courtesan, following a slight misunderstanding near a towpath. After some time perfecting his craft amongst wealthy ladies around the continent, Flynt returned to his home town of London, where he had to relearn everything, because the English still don’t seem to know what they want. A bi-lingual, multi-instrumental, adventure-seeking polymath, Flynt lists his hobbies as mixing us the perfect pink gin, giving you foot rubs, and always remembering exactly where we left the car.

If you could only eat one ‘Penny Sweet’ for the rest of your life, what would it be?

Probably Jelly Beans. A least there’s variety.

What is one common misconception about the sex industry you would like to change?

There is nothing seedy or wrong about paying for sex, as long as your provider has made that decision for themselves. Though I appreciate that ‘decision’ in many contexts is a complicated issue, which is why these things need talking about, and not be buried under bizarre legislation or moral posturing.

What is one thing you would like people to know about sex work? 

It comes in more flavours than there are Jelly Beans. I didn’t appreciate that until I got to know my fellow cast members. We all appear to have found our respective niches and then worked the hell out of them for whatever reason, be that good or bad. But sex work does seem to be necessarily solitary. It sounds like a contradiction given the physical exchange of the job, but there you go. And yes, many of us care very much about our clients – the nice ones, anyway (so I guess that’s more than one thing).

Is this your first time working in theatre? What’s it been like?

I’ve worked in both television and publishing, but never theatre, which forces collaboration like no other. Your deadline is a live space, and the feedback from audiences is immediate, and unpredictable, and intoxicating.

Describe the See Me Now rehearsal room vibes in three words (or emojis).

“Shitload of doors” (You really need to see the show to understand this!)

What did you want to be growing up?

A writer, actor or director. Professionally speaking, I have accomplished the first two, and only one of those also involved having sex for money …

If days were 28 hours long, what would you do with the 4 extra hours?

I’d cook! I love to cook and I never have time. My beautiful fiancee is from the Brazilian state of Bahia. She produces the most fantastic quick food with cheap ingredients and a pressure cooker. I need to get back in the kitchen.

What’s your favourite song and why?

It changes all the time, but in the show I play the blues piano for Dee, another cast member. She’s a pleasure to accompany, has a phenomenal voice, and her tune is really catchy. We all go home humming it.

What’s your favourite play or movie you’ve ever seen? 

Macbeth, Jaws, The Book of Mormon, Glengarry Glen Ross, The Big Leboswki .. a lot of the usual suspects. But I remember having dreams after seeing The Cherry Orchard  as directed by Sam Mendes with Simon Russell Beale in about 2009, that really affected me. I have a BA in English Lit but Chekov was a bit lost on me until then. My guiltiest pleasure is And Then There Were None  by Agatha Christi, which I saw as a fourteen year old boy somewhere in Ontario, Canada. It still amazes me that she could employ such broadly wooden characterisation and murder almost her entire cast in quite silly ways over ninety minutes or so, yet modern audiences, myself included, remain credulous and hypnotised. Theatre magic.

If you could have one supernatural power which would you choose and why?

Flight. But only while invisible.

Do you think you will want to continue being involved in theatre after this production?

Yes , at least with the Young Vic. It is a remarkable place to work, a worthwhile place to think, and has a fine bar in which to make friends and people-watch. Should it not happen, I will cherish the memory.

Flynt stars in See Me Now  which runs 11 Feb – 4 Mar in the Young Vic’s Maria. Tickets for this production are all sold out but you are welcome to join our returns queues from an hour before each performance. Find more information on See Me Now here