Good Chance launch a brand new temporary theatre in Paris

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We’re pleased to announce that Young Vic associate company Good Chance have built and launched a new temporary theatre in Paris following on from their previous venue at the refugee camp in Calais last year.

The team have spent the last four months in Paris, trying to understand the complex problems faced by the growing refugee population there. Through meeting and talking with theatres, artists and humanitarian associations they set out to create an inclusive space that helps to create empathy and understanding through theatre and art.

The theatre is an impressive 11-metre dome, that will migrate through Paris with a longer term view of setting the theatre up during long encampments in different places. The Good Chance team will be creating a daily artistic programme with local people and refugees.

A spokesperson for Good Chance said “As the ties between Britain and Europe are redrawn, we want to build new cultural links with our French and international friends, standing alongside them as we re-imagine new, more exciting, more united worlds.

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The Good Chance team were joined by members of the Young Vic team to help with the build. 

Good Chance Paris will be in the north of the city in partnership with Collectif MU before moving to the gardens of the Theatre de la Ville for the duration of the Chantiers d’Europe Festival (2-24 May) before continuing its migration across Paris.

Pioneering theatre company Good Chance are based at the Young Vic. Good Chance builds temporary theatres of hope and works in solidarity to make people’s voices heard.

For more information, please visit http://goodchance.org.uk/

Photography credit: David Sandison

 

In conversation with Peter Brook

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Peter Brook at Theatre des Bouffes du Nord. Photo by Simon Annand.

We spoke to legendary theatre director Peter Brook in Paris at the Bouffes Du Nord ahead of the London premiere of Battlefield at the Young Vic. 

Theatre is a process. In a process, something is moving and developing every day, getting a bit better, maybe getting a little farther.

Over the years people have asked the question: “When you do a play, do you think you’re helping to change the world?”  I say: “My god no!”.  But I know that when you’ve got a group of ten actors, however much on the first day they’re different, you have a common aim and it is immediate.  It’s like a football team because when it comes to the match, nobody can think of anything but the immediate.  Something is moving and developing every day.  This little world is changing.  Rehearsal time is always short but the pressure brings intensity, which in turn brings everyone nearer to one another.  If a group of actors have worked together and they have become a whole, they know that with their story which they are longing to share, they can’t exist without an audience.  And they know that time is limited.

When I started working all we had was just three weeks and I fought and fought until we could bring it up to eight weeks.  I think for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, we got ten weeks out of Stratford, and then when we did the Mahabharata in our own theatre, on our own conditions, we could take ten years.

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What’s interesting is that there is no such thing as a bad audience.  The more diverse, the bigger the mixture, the better the audience.  Gradually they come to what for us is the test.  The audience is won.

We have to go on preparing, building, sharing, until a point when that whole group of people who have each come off the street with their own preoccupations suddenly are touched.  And that’s a mysterious thing.  For a moment, they and the performers have become one.  And that for us is the only real test – we’re delighted if people applaud, it’s natural – but if before the applause there is that moment of silence, that is the ultimate reward.

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The Bouffe du Nord, Paris. June 2015.

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Battlefield runs at the YV from 3 – 27 Feb. Click here to watch the video of Peter Brook in conversation and head to our Facebook page for a sneak peek at the company in rehearsal.

11 Questions with the cast of A View from the Bridge – Richard Hansell

Jonah Russell and Richard Hansell in rehearsals for A View from the Bridge

Jonah Russell and Richard Hansell in rehearsals for A View from the Bridge

Richard Hansell plays Louis in A View from the Bridge at the Young Vic until 7 June. Here are his answers to our 11 Questions…

Can you describe your character in A View from the Bridge in three words?
Eddie’s best friend.

What are you usually doing 10 minutes before the show begins?
Having a cup of Lapsang Souchong.

What is your favourite play (seen, read or worked on)?
The Love Suicides at Sonezaki by Chikamatsu. A Kabuki interpretation with Nakamura Ganjiro.

What is your favourite midnight snack?
Peanut butter on rice cakes.

What is your favourite word?
Flibbertigibbet.

What are you most passionate about?
Nature and the future of the Earth.

Favourite holiday you’ve ever been on?
Egypt, when I was 9.

Favourite city and why?
Paris – it always makes me feel good.

What is your favourite song?
Night Ride Home by Joni Mitchell.

If you could have been born in any era, which would it be and why?
Greece in the hay-day of its enlightenment or Tibet.

If you could have any one supernatural power which would you choose and why?
Clairvoyance.

A View from the Bridge runs at the Young Vic until 7 June. £5 standing tickets and day seats both available from 10am in person. To find out more, click here.

11 Questions with Sizwe Banzi is Dead’s Taio Lawson

Matthew Xia and Taio Lawson,  Sizwe Banzi is Dead’s Trainee Assistant Director answers our 11 Questions….

If you had to pick a favourite line from the play, which one would it be and why?
‘Her husband got arrested for that thing… I’ll tell you about it later.’ – Because it opens up a story that is never concluded. I love it.

What is your favourite midnight snack?
I can’t eat that late anymore! Got love handles to lose. However, the food I dream of at midnight is Häagen-Dazs vanilla ice cream.

What is your favourite word?
Obfuscation. As it seems to best describe my general, everyday state of mind.

What are you most passionate about?
There are too many things! I can’t answer this without seeming facetious.

If days were 28 hours long, what would you do with the extra 4 hours?
Fill them with appreciation of all my guilty pleasures. I would listen to Hounds of Love on repeat, watch Love Actually and as much of The Lord of the Rings as possible. And read a Lemony Snicket book. Who said men can’t multitask?

If you could be in a room full of any one thing, what would it be?
Cup cakes from Magnolia Bakery in New York.

Favourite holiday you’ve ever been on?
Stromboli, Italy. With my brother and father. Seeing that beautiful volcano.

Favourite city and why?
Paris. Bars are open later and it smells like the same french man has gone around the city peeing on everything. I love his dedication to the cause.

What is your favourite song?
Absolutely impossible to pick. But at the moment I have two. The Lottery by The Stepkids and The Memory by Roy Ayres.

If you could have been born in any era, which would it be and why?
In the late 40s/early 50s so I could have my teens and twenties in the 60s/70s. The music was just too damn good! I would go to so many gigs! Hendrix, Miles Davis, Bobbi Humphreys, Chich, Stanley Clark, Marvin… the list goes on!

If you could have any one supernatural power which would you choose and why?
To be able to control electronic appliances. That way I could turn on my boiler from my bed when I’m trying to get cosy. Or turn the TV off without having to search for the remote, which I always lose. In fact, the ability to always find the remote control!

Taio Lawson is supported through the Boris Karloff Trainee Directors Programme at the Young Vic.

Sizwe Banzi is Dead is on now until 15 March at the Young Vic. Click here to book now or find out more

11 Questions with the cast of Happy Days – Juliet Stevenson

Juliet Stevenson as Winnie in Happy Days. Photo by Johan Persson.

‘Juliet Stevenson lights up the role of Winnie’ (★★★★ The Observer) in Samuel Beckett’s Happy Days. She took a little time out from being buried in her mound to answer our 11 Questions

Can you describe your character Winnnie in Happy Days in three words? Indomitable, lonely, resourceful.  But equally – desperate, funny, optimistic… I am cheating because 3 words don’t do her justice.

What are you usually doing 10 minutes before the show begins? On this show I am pre-set, sleeping in my mound,  so ten minutes before the performance begins I am usually clambering up into the set, before taking my ten minute pre-show kip. Not really asleep of course – doing leg and foot stretch exercises underneath the set to keep the circulation going while I wait for the start….

What is your favourite play (seen, read or worked on)? Impossible question! Too many contenders… A Dolls House, Yerma, Measure for Measure would be among my favourites worked on… Oh, and Happy Days is right up there now….

What is your favourite midnight snack? Nutella.

What is your favourite word? Another impossible one! Cantankerous, melancholy, effervescent… among many others. Come to think about it, this might double as the answer to question number 1.

What are you most passionate about? Probably the welfare of children – my own and the world’s.

If days were 28 hours long, what would you do with the 4 extra hours? Read. I never have the time I would love to have for reading for my own pleasure.

If you could be in a room full of any one thing, what would it be?Books.

Favourite holiday you’ve ever been on? With my partner Hugh and the children, exploring North Eastern Australia, travelling up the coast and into the rainforest, fishing on the Daintree River, snorkeling on the Great Barrier Reef – every moment of it was magical.

Favourite city and why? A toss up between London, Paris and Vancouver. Prague and New York also big contenders.

If you could have any one supernatural power which would you choose and why? I  would say the power to restore life, but unless I kept it mightily secret I imagine I would be overwhelmed by demands to use it. So let’s settle for flight.

Happy Days returns to the Young Vic on 13 Feb 2015. Call 020 7922 2922 or click here to book now.

Win a trip to Paris to see The Suit

The Young Vic, Time Out and World Stages London are hosting a competition to win a trip to Paris to see The Suit before it comes to London!

Winners will receive round-trip Eurostar tickets for two, a two-night stay in the luxurious 4 star Champs Elysees McMahon hotel, and tickets to see the world premiere of The Suit at the celebrated Théâtre des Bouffes du Nord.  A new musical adapted and directed by Peter Brook and Marie-Hélène Estienne, The Suit is based on Can Themba’s heartbreakingly beautiful South African story of lust, betrayal and retribution.

The competition is free to enter and closes 1 April – enter here now for your chance to win!