Good Chance launch a brand new temporary theatre in Paris

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We’re pleased to announce that Young Vic associate company Good Chance have built and launched a new temporary theatre in Paris following on from their previous venue at the refugee camp in Calais last year.

The team have spent the last four months in Paris, trying to understand the complex problems faced by the growing refugee population there. Through meeting and talking with theatres, artists and humanitarian associations they set out to create an inclusive space that helps to create empathy and understanding through theatre and art.

The theatre is an impressive 11-metre dome, that will migrate through Paris with a longer term view of setting the theatre up during long encampments in different places. The Good Chance team will be creating a daily artistic programme with local people and refugees.

A spokesperson for Good Chance said “As the ties between Britain and Europe are redrawn, we want to build new cultural links with our French and international friends, standing alongside them as we re-imagine new, more exciting, more united worlds.

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The Good Chance team were joined by members of the Young Vic team to help with the build. 

Good Chance Paris will be in the north of the city in partnership with Collectif MU before moving to the gardens of the Theatre de la Ville for the duration of the Chantiers d’Europe Festival (2-24 May) before continuing its migration across Paris.

Pioneering theatre company Good Chance are based at the Young Vic. Good Chance builds temporary theatres of hope and works in solidarity to make people’s voices heard.

For more information, please visit http://goodchance.org.uk/

Photography credit: David Sandison

 

Now We Are Here – Reviews

Golda Rosheuvel in Now We Are Here at the Young Vic. Photo by HelenMurray (2).

Golda Rosheuvel in Now We Are Here | Photo by Helen Murray

We’re sad about the fact it’s over, but definitely not sad about the reception it received. The reviews are in for our new Taking Part play Now We Are Here – a brave collaboration of true stories written by four refugees and the award-winning poet and spoken word artist Deanna Rodger.  Take a look below to see what critics made of the show.

★★★★
“This is seductive theatre, persuasive protest – the stories will haunt you”
The Times – read the full review here.

★★★★
“Simple but starkly affecting – anyone still in any doubt about theatre’s ability to tackle the pressing stories of the day should acquaint themselves sharpish with the Young Vic’s wholly admirable Horizons season”
The Evening Standard – read the full review here.

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The Cast of Now We Are Here | Photo by Helen Murray

★★★★
“Ian Rickson directs this sensitive, compelling production which strips away everything but the bare minimum needed for these voices to be heard”
The Independent – read the full review here.

★★★★
“It is absolutely paramount that more of these stories are told so that we are not desensitised by dehumanising statistics and relentless news reports. […] These beautifully told stories with humour and wit are just the tip of the iceberg.”
Theatre News – read the full review here.

“One takes away from “Now We Are Here” great pride in the courage of the individuals presented alongside an abiding wish that an often unforgiving world can — or will — just let them be.”
The New York Times – read the review here.

Queen of Syria – reviews

Rehearsals for Queens of Syria. Photo by Deema Dabis.jpg

“I have a scream I have to let out. I want the world to hear it.”

The reviews are in for Queens of Syria an extraordinary modern retelling of Euripides’ Trojan Women by a group of Syrian women. Take a look below to see what critics make of the show.

★★★★★
“A raw reminder of our common humanity, hitting an extraordinary pitch of intensity”
The Times – read the full review here.

★★★★
“A terribly moving show for theatregoers but, most importantly, for members of the human race”
The Evening Standard – read the full review here.

★★★★
“An eloquent re-working of an ancient text – intense, compelling and humbling”
The Independent – read the full review here.

★★★★
“It’s a piece full of pain and longing —but there is icy, humbling rage here too”
Financial Times – read the full review here.

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Queens of Syria runs at the Young Vic now until 9 July and then goes on a UK tour. More info below:

11 – 12 July 2016
The North Wall Arts Centre, South Parade, Oxford, OX2 7JN
13 – 14 July 2016
Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, Gardner Centre Road Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9RA
15 – 16 July 2016
Everyman Playhouse, 5-11 Hope St, Liverpool L1 9BH
18 July 2016
West Yorkshire Playhouse, Playhouse Square, Quarry Hill, Leeds, LS2 7UP
19 – 20 July 2016
Assembly Roxy, 2 Roxburgh Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9SU
21 July 2016
Assembly Rooms, 40 North Bailey, Durham, DH1 3ET
24 July 2016
New London Theatre, 166 Drury Lane, London, WC2B 5PW

Astoria | Latest YV short

Astoria, the latest in the series of Young Vic short films, was released alongside the Young Vic’s Horizons season announcement earlier this week.

Written and directed by Paul Mason, former economics editor of Channel 4 News and BBC’s Newsnight, it follows a Syrian refugee’s journey to the West. Once there, an encounter with the past in a Budapest hotel draws a parallel between Europe’s historical and current response to refugees.

The experience highlights the necessity of resistance to oppression – and the danger of losing sight of history. In Astoria, Paul Mason explores the irony that today’s refugees are moving through a landscape that was the site of genocide; the limitations of what individual people can do when faced with atrocity; the way resistance and memory intertwine. Astoria was filmed in Budapest, Hungary and Stoke Newington, London in early 2016, Astoria stars July Namir and Sonya Cassidy.

In 2012, Paul covered the rise of the far right party in Hungary. Whilst there, his team stayed at the Astoria Hotel and discovered it was used as S.S. Lieutenant Colonel Adolf Eichmann’s headquarters and as a torture chamber during World War Two. Since then, Mason has wanted to tell that story.

Paul said, “It is axiomatic that the story of the refugees will be told by refugees. But the story of our inhospitable continent, and our forgetfulness about why people leave their homes, and where hatred leads – that is our story and we have to confront it. Astoria is my personal response.”

A new series of short films based on the experiences of refugees from around the world will be released in 2016 – 17.

You can find out more about Horizons, a season exploring the lives of refugees, at the Young Vic in our Horizons blog post.

HumanMe – a response to the refugee crisis

Once a year our Young Associates have the opportunity to create a performance in response to a topic they want to explore. This year they chose to create something that represented the human side of the refugee crisis, going against what the stereotypical negative story of groups of migrants the media tends to portray. They created a multi-discipline performance entitled, HumanMe.

YV HumanMe rehearsal

The production featured three different elements; a short video documentary, a ‘Syrian lounge’ and a performance by a cast of 9 young people from our neighbourhood, directed by Diyan Zora and Fiona Sowole.

YV HumanMe rehearsal

The cast of 9 devised short scenes exploring new and different relationships forged between strangers as a result of the crisis. Many of the stories which featured were influenced from one of the participant’s own experiences living in Calais. The group focused on sharing stories from individual refugee’s perspectives in an attempt to humanise the crisis and the positive relationships that can form in difficult circumstances.

YV HumanMe rehearsal

The video documentary the Associates created featured two interviews with a 16 year old Syrian refugee who discussed his journey and his family who are now spread across Europe and Andrew Connolly, a journalist who helped contextualise the crisis and the issues and hardships refugees are facing day to day.

YA HumanMe - Syrian Lounge

The ground floor of the community art space Platform in Southwark was transformed into a Syrian styled lounge. The audience were invited to enjoy the space after the performance and to encourage them to talk about what they had watched over some Syrian food and music.

When asked why the refugee crisis was chosen one of the Young Associates, Fiona explained, ‘We wanted to do something that we cared about and something that was important to us. When we heard about the Good Chance Theatre closing down we knew that we wanted to express how important this crisis was to us. We care about what is going on and wanted that to show in our work.’

HumanMe was created by our four current Young Associates. Our associates are young people from Southwark who are learning the ropes for a year in different Young Vic departments, arming them with transferable skills for future employment. Our Young Associates are:

Kate Clement Production
Teniola Osholoye Finance and Fundraising
Fiona Sowole Taking Part and Directors Program
Helen Spincemaille Press & Marketing